Posted in Blog, Resources, Review

Workshop Review – DevOps for Hackers with Hands-On Labs w/Ralph May (Black Hills Information Security)

I’ve been wanting to get some exposure to deployment options like Ansible and Terraform, so when a Black Hill Information Security (BHIS) workshop popped up in my LinkedIn feed taking about using both for hackers, I mashed the registration link as fast as I could.

My “why” for taking the workshop was to have a better idea of how I can use Ansible and Terraform to better manage my lab environments. Since I tend to pop up and destroy cloud resources, it made sense to learn more and see if it could help. Plus it’s not going to hurt to know the basics of either one. That the workshop used Digital Oceans was a bonus. It’s nice to get out of the AWS and Azure worlds to see something new.

The TL:DR, if you see a Black Hills Information Security, Wild West Hackin’ Fest , or ActiveCountermeasures webinar or workshop that covers something you are interested in, sign up. It will be a good use of your time.

Workshop Resources

Workshop YouTube Recording: DevOps for Hackers with Hands-On Labs w/ Ralph May (4-Hour Workshop) – YouTube

Workshop Website (looks like Ralph May turned this into a public Notion page, so I’m linking that rather than the original): DevOps for Hackers with Hands-On Labs w/ Ralph May (4-Hour Workshop) (notion.site)

The original website was https://workshop.hackerops.dev

Workshop Overview

This 4 hour (plus an hour for setup) workshop included 4 labs (Terraform, Ansible, Docker, and C2 Deployment). Ralph did an introduction of each topic before walking through the lab. A huge help was that he provided completed lab files. Using the completed files I was able to keep up with the labs. There’s no way I could have typed fast enough. I might have been able to if I were more familiar with the platforms, but this approach worked for me. My plan is to go through the workshop again at my own pace where I can build the lab files myself knowing I have functional files to check things against if needed. The initial hour for setup was helpful since I had a brain fart about unpacking the VM and didn’t put it in a specific folder prior to extracting. The BHIS Discord was very active during the setup time, and everyone I saw having issues was able to get moving in the right direction before things started. I really appreciate this extra time because labs don’t go well when your environment is wonky. This lab setup was same day, which I think may be a more effective method. An earlier workshop sent the lab files earlier, and I think that is more likely to get put off until it’s time for the workshop. But that was also a pretty large VM download, so there may have been a need to spread that traffic out. I think you would get a decent amount out of the workshop just following along and not working on the labs during the live portion. I prefer to do what I can hands-on during the live portion so I have a better idea of what I want to go back to.

Presentation slides and lab guides were available for download, and it looks like those will be available on the Notion site for at least a little while. They mentioned Ralph is developing this into a full 16 hour workshop, and I think for anyone who is managing infrastructure for pentesting or red teaming, it could be a good time investment. I could see using this approach to pop up custom infrastructure quickly for each engagement and easily keep things separated out. The BHIS team also built in breaks every hour, so you could have a few minutes to step out for a bio break, check in on work, or wander aimlessly for a bit. That approach is working well for their 4 hour workshops that I’ve been in.

My Takeaways

I wanted to get a good idea of what things were and how they were used – mission accomplished in that regard. These are my brief, extremely high level takeaways. There’s a lot more to it, but these are the things that I want to have stored in my head so I have an idea of what I might want to reference for different projects.

  • Terraform – infrastructure as code, manage infrastructure, fast and consistent, free/open source, great for cloud and API
  • Ansible – infrastructure as code, configuration management, Python and YAML, slower, OS config
  • Docker (this was what was most familiar to me in the workshop) – containers, CI/CD, runs on all the things, application isolation, clean up your images
  • C2 deployment – there are a lot of C2 options available (and a lot of fun logos), calling some just a C2 framework is underselling their capabilities
    • Mythic – Docker(!), cool but there’s a lot going on, need to research more if I want to effectively use this, can be deployed with Ansible
    • I need to look up the ones I’m not familiar with (not being a pentester these aren’t something I can justify a lot of time playing with) to keep up with what’s out there. I need to look at some of these for labs so I’m not just using Metasploit, Empire, etc. because those are the ones I’m most familiar with. But also beware of chasing shiny things.

Post-Workshop To Dos

I want to go back through and do the labs by creating the files myself. Spending that time will help internalize the capabilities of Terraform and Ansible. I’ll probably do this using Digital Ocean initially, but I think the next time I’m building labs in AWS or Azure, I want to at least try setting things up with Terraform or Ansible as appropriate.

I probably would not go for the 16 hour workshop right now just because what it would cover are not my primary responsibilities. If I were in a role where I could use this approach to be more efficient, I’d be jumping at the opportunity. BHIS and WWHF have some of the most reasonable training rates around. And they are offering even more with a cyberrange as part of their Antisyphon training stuff, so keep an eye on their training schedule.

Wrap Up

The content was well prepared and well presented. Labs worked and had files available so you could keep up if needed. I have an understanding of how Terraform and Ansible can be used. I know where I can go to find out more and ways to practice using them. I wouldn’t even call myself a beginner, but I know enough to learn more. That’s a big part of why I take things like this.

Bottom line, this was a good use of my time. I will continue to take advantage of the training from BHIS/WWHF/ACM as much as I can.

Author:

Lifelong paradox - cyber sec enthusiast - loves to learn

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